May 2008 Pearce Mold Report — from MOMSAH Committee

McGregor Pearce, MPH

Environmental Health Consultant

P.O. Box 14481, St. Paul, MN 55114

Phone: (651) 646-4513

E-mail: pearc010@umn.edu

Results of sampling at: 1725 Grand Ave., St. Paul, MN

Samples collected on 4/24/08

Sample location and time

CFU/m3

and number of colonies on plate

Molds found

1.

Main floor, meeting room

50 liter SAS air sample

Ambient sample

360/m3

18 colonies on plate

11 Penicillium spp

3 Cladosporium spp

2 Aspergillus spp

1 yeast

1 sterile fungus

2.

2nd floor corridor

50 liter SAS air sample

Ambient sample

260 /m3

13 colonies on plate

5 Penicillium spp

4 Aspergillus spp

2 Cladosporium spp

1 Wallemia sp

1 Alternaria sp

3.

2nd floor apartment

50 liter SAS air sample

Ambient sample

400/m3

20 colonies on plate

10 Penicillium spp

5 Cladosporium spp

4 Wallemia spp

1 Aspergillus nidulans

4.

Basement fellowship room

50 liter SAS air sample

Ambient sample

40/m3

2 colonies on plate

2 Aspergillus spp
5.

Outdoors

50 liter SAS air sample

Ambient sample

700/m3

35 colonies on plate

29 Cladosporium spp

3 sterile fungi

2 Alternaria spp

6.

Meeting room, book shelf behind piano.

Rodac contact plate

Surface sample

+++

Moderate growth

25 Cladosporium spp

20 Penicillium spp

5 Aspergillus spp

3 Aspergillus glaucus

1 Aspergillus nidulans

7.

Meeting room, high window sill on east wall

Rodac contact plate

Surface sample

++++

Heavy growth

75% Cladosporium spp

15%Penicillium spp

10% Aspergillus spp

8.

1st floor corridor carpet

10 liter SAS air sample

Aggressive sample

14,100/m3

141 colonies on plate

127 Cladosporium spp

25 Penicillium spp

7 Aspergillus spp

5 yeasts

9.

2nd floor corridor carpet, by elevator

10 liter SAS air sample

Aggressive sample

7700/m3

77 colonies on plate

35 Cladosporium spp

24 Penicillium spp

7 yeasts

5 Aspergillus spp

5 Alternaria spp

1 Aspergillus niger

10.

2nd floor apartment carpet, kitchen area by refrigerator.

10 liter SAS air sample

Aggressive sample

5200/m3

52 colonies on plate

21 Penicillium spp

19 Cladosporium spp

7 Wallemia spp

2 Alternaria spp

2 Aspergillus glaucus

1 Aspergillus nidulans

11.

2nd floor apartment, living room carpet

10 liter SAS air sample

Aggressive sample

15,500/m3

155 colonies on plate

147 Penicillium spp

8 Cladosporium spp

12.

2nd floor apartment, bed room carpet

10 liter SAS air sample

Aggressive sample

21.900/m3

219 colonies on plate

Sample overloaded, count is a low estimate

95% Penicillium spp

5% Aspergillus spp

13.

2nd floor corridor, plywood ceiling (exposed roof decking)

Tape lift

Surface sample

Spotty fungal growth Aureobasidium spp

McGregor Pearce, MPH

Environmental Health Consultant

P.O. Box 14481, St. Paul, MN 55114

Phone: (651) 646-4513

E-mail: pearc010@umn.edu

May 14, 2008

Greg Whitley-Mott

1725 Grand Ave.

St. Paul, MN 55105

Dear Mr. Whitley-Mott

Enclosed is a table listing the results of mold testing performed at the Friends Meeting House, at 1725 Grand Ave, St. Paul, MN on April 24, 2008. These results show some slightly elevated mold levels in the common areas of the building, but the worst problem seems to be in the residential apartment on the second floor. You reported a recent flooding event on the second floor related to a problem with the sprinkler system in the second floor ceiling. This may be contributing to the elevated mold levels I measured. From what I was told, there was no systematic professional effort to determine abate wetting due to the flooding. A professional contractor would have used moisture detection equipment to find the wet areas, then used dehumidification to dry your property effectively. This is the best way to prevent mold damage in a flooded building. Turning on fans and crossing fingers often leads to problems down the road. Once things have dried out, there is no way to find out if damage occurred short of tearing open the walls and looking.

My results also suggest that there is a local problem on the north end of the second floor, where the mold levels, both by numbers and kinds indicate a moisture problem.

Your building is an older home which has had an addition tacked onto the north end. I am not a professional engineer, but I did notice some features that may be contributing to a moisture problem on the north end of the second floor. While the cladding appears to be stucco it is actually a synthetic stucco material that is notoriously leaky. During my inspection I showed you that the plywood at the bottom of the cantilevered north wall was soaking wet. You also told me that the mattresses in the bed room had mold growing under them. I suspect this is due to air leakage and deficient insulation, which create a cold surface that condenses moisture. I also notice that the wooden apartment window frames are showing a good deal of water damage. This may be due to condenstion, but there may be moisture problems in the wall as well.

I would recommend that you have an energy audit done as soon as possible to determine whether there is effective corrective action that can be taken to prevent further condensation problems. I would also suggest doing some invasive exploration to determine the condition of the wall cavities on the north end of the building.

In conclusion, it is difficult to determine the extent of mold damage due to the sprinkler failure without invasive exploration. The exposed plywood ceiling on the second floor has mold growing on it. This problem will continue as long as the roof deck is left exposed. This surface will be very cold in the winter, and conditioned air will condense on the plywood and continue to promote mold growth. I would suggest scrubbing this surface, then sealing the attic space to create an air tight cold attic. I also recommend investigating the condition in the walls of the north end 2nd floor apartment. Once the extent of the moisture problem is determined and corrective action taken, I would suggest discarding all the carpeting and giving the living quarters a thorough cleaning.

If I can be of any further help, please feel free to call me.

Sincerely,

Mac Pearce

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